Red No. 3Reblogged from Red No. 3

red3blog:

* Men who don’t respect consent don’t have a special right to keep that private.

* Men who threaten violence against women don’t have a special right to keep that private.

* Men who disregard a woman’s sexual agency to objectify her don’t have a special right to keep that private.

* Men who abuse women don’t have a special right to keep that private.

(via farandolae)

Source red3blog

firedanceryote:

lysa44:

firedanceryote:

white-aster:

murdorito:

windows7virus:

bookrat:

One of my hens attempted to crow this morning.
I didn’t realize it at the time. No, my immediate assumption was that something was brutally murdering one of my birds. I rushed to the rescue only to find the yard conspicuously empty of threats, but I didn’t relax until that awful rasping caw came again from my right.
Here she is compared to another black bantam I got at the same time as her. Her comb and wattles are huge, but I just kinda disregarded it because those two aren’t the same breed even though they’re similar looking. Shouldn’t have, that comb is almost rooster-sized regardless of breed differences.
Just wanted to share, I figured Tumblr would get a kick out of a non-binary chicken.

Years ago I had something similar happen. In the early spring a batch of mixed breed chicks hatched (all I can remember is that they were 1/4 silkie) as the months passed and the chicks grew and their sex characteristics developed, all hens… sort of.
One bird, a petite black hen, started crowing, by the fall she was crowing just as well and often as the roosters we kept in the coop. But it didn’t stop there. During the winter I noticed this hen exclusively roosting with other hens, not that odd, but then one day I saw her mounting them.
When we let them out off the coop to free-range in the spring she had a small harem of other hens. They would follow her, “mate” with her, and only roost next to her, and, if a rooster antagonized her or her harem, she would spar with him (not always successfully). 
So remember, if anyone tries to explain away non-binary identities with a “Natural Order of Things” argument, flap aggressively at him and try to stab him with your leg spurs.  

nonbinary chickens are pretty common! Reason #89574897345 why I fucking love chickens.

"So remember, if anyone tries to explain away non-binary identities with a “Natural Order of Things” argument, flap aggressively at him and try to stab him with your leg spurs." 
<3  :D

I’ve had hens crow, grow spurs over 1” long, stop laying and generally behave like roos. The weird part is they started off as normal hens, then a year down the road started acting like a roo and developing features of one like larger comb and wattle and spurs. I regret not knowing taxidermy sooner or I would have kept my own bird preserved because she developed HUGE spurs measuring almost 2” long. She was a red sex link. My other wanna be roo taxidermy was impossible since there was nothing left to mount. She was killed by a hawk and all that was left of her was a few feathers.

I had 3 hens I bought from a feed store, two rhode island reds and a black girl, I can’t remember what breed she was said to be, but she was about twice the size of my rhode’s and was very pretty with green highlights and such.
One of my rhodies ended up growing spurs, a huge waddle and comb, and I thought my neighbor was out of his mind when he said he’d heard them crowing, because being in the city limits I was very sure to have hens. Well, my little girl named Hawk started acting more like a roo than a hen, though she’d still lay eggs, because I was getting 3-5 eggs a day, 2-4 brown and 1 whitish green from Raven.
One day when I went to gather eggs my 2 normal girls were being very broody, and didn’t like me taking their eggs. Imagine my surprise when they had fertilized eggs. I’d started separating Hawk’s from the others because I wanted to know who was laying what, and Pollo and Raven had fertilized eggs from my third hen.
Chickens are amazing, but they are weird as fuck sometimes.

Omg that sounds more like a roo who wanted to be a hen or a hermaphrodite chicken. If he/she fertilized eggs it means Hawk had at least one testicle. To lay eggs though they had to have at least one ovary… And both of these had to be functional. Ie your bird was likely a true medically defined hermaphrodite possessing both male and female reproductive organs. Hens who act/look like Roos are still biologically hens and lack testicles to fertilize anything.
Big black hen laying greenish eggs would be an Easter egger or an Ameraucana.
High-res

Dinosaur GodsReblogged from Dinosaur Gods

firedanceryote:

lysa44:

firedanceryote:

white-aster:

murdorito:

windows7virus:

bookrat:

One of my hens attempted to crow this morning.

I didn’t realize it at the time. No, my immediate assumption was that something was brutally murdering one of my birds. I rushed to the rescue only to find the yard conspicuously empty of threats, but I didn’t relax until that awful rasping caw came again from my right.

Here she is compared to another black bantam I got at the same time as her. Her comb and wattles are huge, but I just kinda disregarded it because those two aren’t the same breed even though they’re similar looking. Shouldn’t have, that comb is almost rooster-sized regardless of breed differences.

Just wanted to share, I figured Tumblr would get a kick out of a non-binary chicken.

Years ago I had something similar happen. In the early spring a batch of mixed breed chicks hatched (all I can remember is that they were 1/4 silkie) as the months passed and the chicks grew and their sex characteristics developed, all hens… sort of.

One bird, a petite black hen, started crowing, by the fall she was crowing just as well and often as the roosters we kept in the coop. But it didn’t stop there. During the winter I noticed this hen exclusively roosting with other hens, not that odd, but then one day I saw her mounting them.

When we let them out off the coop to free-range in the spring she had a small harem of other hens. They would follow her, “mate” with her, and only roost next to her, and, if a rooster antagonized her or her harem, she would spar with him (not always successfully). 

So remember, if anyone tries to explain away non-binary identities with a “Natural Order of Things” argument, flap aggressively at him and try to stab him with your leg spurs.  

nonbinary chickens are pretty common! Reason #89574897345 why I fucking love chickens.

"So remember, if anyone tries to explain away non-binary identities with a “Natural Order of Things” argument, flap aggressively at him and try to stab him with your leg spurs." 

<3  :D

I’ve had hens crow, grow spurs over 1” long, stop laying and generally behave like roos. The weird part is they started off as normal hens, then a year down the road started acting like a roo and developing features of one like larger comb and wattle and spurs. I regret not knowing taxidermy sooner or I would have kept my own bird preserved because she developed HUGE spurs measuring almost 2” long. She was a red sex link. My other wanna be roo taxidermy was impossible since there was nothing left to mount. She was killed by a hawk and all that was left of her was a few feathers.

I had 3 hens I bought from a feed store, two rhode island reds and a black girl, I can’t remember what breed she was said to be, but she was about twice the size of my rhode’s and was very pretty with green highlights and such.

One of my rhodies ended up growing spurs, a huge waddle and comb, and I thought my neighbor was out of his mind when he said he’d heard them crowing, because being in the city limits I was very sure to have hens. Well, my little girl named Hawk started acting more like a roo than a hen, though she’d still lay eggs, because I was getting 3-5 eggs a day, 2-4 brown and 1 whitish green from Raven.

One day when I went to gather eggs my 2 normal girls were being very broody, and didn’t like me taking their eggs. Imagine my surprise when they had fertilized eggs. I’d started separating Hawk’s from the others because I wanted to know who was laying what, and Pollo and Raven had fertilized eggs from my third hen.

Chickens are amazing, but they are weird as fuck sometimes.

Omg that sounds more like a roo who wanted to be a hen or a hermaphrodite chicken. If he/she fertilized eggs it means Hawk had at least one testicle. To lay eggs though they had to have at least one ovary… And both of these had to be functional. Ie your bird was likely a true medically defined hermaphrodite possessing both male and female reproductive organs. Hens who act/look like Roos are still biologically hens and lack testicles to fertilize anything.

Big black hen laying greenish eggs would be an Easter egger or an Ameraucana.

(via shadownuri)

Source bookrat